English to Arabic Translation

Arabic is a language spoken predominantly in the Middle East  — but is also spoken in countries all over the world. The language has also influenced other languages, including Bengali, Croatian, English, German, Hindi, and Malay (among others). Find out how to translate English to Arabic for business, school, or travel.

 

The Arabic language is a Semetic language (Syro-Arabian) that formed between 1 and 4 C.E. It’s the Lingua franca (common language) of the arab world. 422 million people all over the world speak Arabic. 

 

Countries that speak Arabic as a first language include:

 

  • Algeria
  • Bahrain
  • Chad
  • Egypt
  • Iraq
  • Jordan
  • Kuwait
  • Lebanon
  • Libya
  • Morocco,
  • Qatar
  • Somalia
  • Sudan
  • Syria
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Yemen

 

It has influenced Persian, Turkish, Kasmiri, and Malay. It is the fifth most-spoken language in the entire world. It is also the official language of 26 states. It was used by scientists, mathematicians, and philosophers in Europe the Middle Ages, so many European languages ‘borrowed’ Arabic words that are now used in everyday vocabulary.  The Quran and Hadith were both written in Arabic, so the language is also the liturgical language of Islam. 

 

There are more than 20 dialects of Arabic as it is spoken in so many areas of the world. Some of the most common dialects of Arabic include:

 

  • Baghdad Arabic
  • Bedouin
  • Chadian Arabic
  • Egyptian Arabic 
  • Libyan Arabic 
  • Moroccan Arabic 
  • Sudanese Arabic 
  • Tunisian Arabic 
  • And many more

English to Arabic Translation

Translating English to Arabic is much more difficult than translating English to languages that use the Latin alphabet, as Arabic uses Arabic alphabet. 

 

Trying to learn Arabic online? Need fast translations for travel, school, or business? We recommend using machine translation software that has an Arabic translation tool and can easily translate text to speech, such as the MyLanguage app, available on Google Play for Android or the Apple Store for iOS. 

 

Software such as Google Translate or Microsoft’s language learning app doesn’t offer the same English translation accuracy as paid apps. 

Arabic Translators

English-Arabic translators and translation services often charge more than translators for languages within one language family. The costs of translating long documents can still be considerable, so we recommend inputting the text into a language translation software program or app (especially since translation apps are now accurate and easy to use). 

 

Check out our online translation tool that can help you learn basic words and phrases, such as hello in other languages

More Online Translation 

At Vocre, we believe that you shouldn’t need to hire a pricey translator to simply communicate with someone. Our automated translation app can translate both written and oral communication.

 

We offer more online translation in the following languages:

 

  • Albanian
  • Armenian
  • Basque
  • Belarusian
  • Bengali
  • Bulgarian
  • Catalan
  • Chinese
  • Croatian
  • Czech
  • Esperanto
  • Estonian
  • Filipino
  • Finnish
  • French
  • Greek
  • Gujarati
  • Haitian
  • Hebrew
  • Hindi
  • Icelandic
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Macedonian
  • Malay
  • Nepali
  • Norwegian
  • Polish
  • Portuguese
  • Romanian
  • Russian
  • Spanish
  • Swahili
  • Swedish
  • Telugu
  • Thai
  • Turkish
  • Vietnamese
  • Yiddish

English to French Translation

The language of French is a Romance language and is the third most-widely spoken language in the European Union. It is the second most-widely spoken language in Canada (after English) and is one of the official languages of Canada. In the U.S., French is the fourth most-widely spoken language in the country. 

 

Overall, about more than 275 million people around the world, and it’s the fifth most-widely spoken language. It’s the second most-popular second-language in the world.  

 

It is most widely spoken in areas of the world where France once controlled (and where the government currently controls), such as French Polynesia, some Caribbean islands, and French Indochina (now Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia). 

 

The most common dialects of French include:

 

  • Acadian French
  • African French 
  • Beglian French
  • Canadian French
  • Louisiana Creole
  • Quebec French
  • Swiss French

 

As Lebanon was also once under French rule, the language is still used in the country; yet, the government strictly controls when Arabic is used and when French can be used. 

English to French Translation

Translating English to French is much more difficult than translating Spanish to French or English to Germanic. This is because French is a Romantic language whereas English is a Germanic language.

 

The French language pronounces many letters and letter combinations completely differently than the English language does. There are also many different French accents. 

 

Trying to learn French online? Need fast translations for travel, school, or business? We recommend using machine translation software that has an French translation tool and can easily translate text to speech, such as the MyLanguage app, available on Google Play for Android or the Apple Store for iOS. 

 

Software such as Google Translate or Microsoft’s language learning app doesn’t offer the same English translation accuracy as paid apps. 

French Translators

English-French translators and translation services don’t charge as much as other language translators, as French and English translators are easier to come by than other language translators. Yet, the costs can still be considerable if you’re trying to translate longer texts, so we recommend inputting the text into a language translation software program or app. 

 

Check out our online translation tool that can help you learn basic words and phrases, such as hello in other languages

More Online Translation 

At Vocre, we believe that you shouldn’t need to hire a pricey translator to simply communicate with someone. Our automated translation app can translate both written and oral communication.

 

We offer more online translation in the following languages:

 

  • Albanian
  • Arabic
  • Armenian
  • Basque
  • Belarusian
  • Bengali
  • Bulgarian
  • Catalan
  • Chinese
  • Croatian
  • Czech
  • Esperanto
  • Estonian
  • Filipino
  • Finnish
  • French
  • Greek
  • Gujarati
  • Haitian
  • Hebrew
  • Hindi
  • Icelandic
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Macedonian
  • Malay
  • Nepali
  • Norwegian
  • Polish
  • Portuguese
  • Romanian
  • Russian
  • Spanish
  • Swahili
  • Swedish
  • Telugu
  • Thai
  • Turkish
  • Vietnamese
  • Yiddish

8 Things You’ll Need to Travel to France

1. Passport and Photo ID

Of course, you’ll need a passport or visa to visit France. Be sure to apply for either document very early on because they can take weeks or months to obtain. You’ll also want to bring along a photo ID.

The ID should be 45mm x 35mm.

The ID allows you to get yourself a Navigo Pass that allows you to travel around for cheap. It costs just €5 for a pass and you can even purchase packages for the week or month. When you have a pass, it allows you to save money on your travels. But you’ll also need an ID to put on the pass, so be sure to bring it along with you.

2. Cash and Debit Card

Cash, debit or credit cards are all easy ways to gain access to your money in France. Cash is good for those times when you go on a train or have to hail a taxi. If you lose your money, it’s stolen on the train (not uncommon) or you run out of money, locate an ATM.

ATMs are all over France, and the actual bank ATMs often don’t charge fees.

Be on the lookout for signs that say “distributeur automatique de billet” to find the ATM. You’ll also want to alert your bank to your travels ahead of time to reduce the risk of your withdrawal being denied due to suspicious activity.

3. Universal Adapter

The mains or electrical outlet in France may be different than what the electronic items in your home country use. A European adapter will be your best bet and will allow you to convert to France’s plugs easily.

You may also need a power converter that ensures you don’t fry your electronics when you plug them in.

4. Vocre Translator+ Mobile Application

Vocre is the go-to mobile application that helps non-French speakers communicate with locals. If you need to ask questions or order food, Vocre can break through the language barrier with voice and text translations.

Download the app and unlock up to 59 languages in an instant.

You can use voice translation to understand what others are saying while using text translation to communicate back to the person. If you don’t know French at a high level, this is a must-have application.

5. Power Bank

Chances are, you’ll have a smart device on you when you’re traveling around France. Everyone is snapping pictures with their smartphones. The problem is that your phone will eventually need to be charged.

If you’re driving around a lot, you can always charge the phone in the car.

Otherwise, you’ll want to bring a power bank along with you for your trip. A power bank allows you to charge your phone, or other device, on-the-go.

6. Neck Wallet

A lot of tourists try escaping the hustle and bustle of Paris to go to the beautiful French countryside. While there’s a sense of security and safety, one of the biggest mistakes you can make it leaving valuables in plain sight.

Neck wallets can easily be hidden and allow you to keep all of your most important documents on you rather than risk them being stolen.

If you can, leave your luggage at the hotel to avoid being a target in Aix en Provence.

7. France Travel Guide

There’s a lot to see when traveling to France. It’s easy to overlook some of the best tourist destinations and even hidden gems that locals only know about. You can rely on online research, but a France travel guide is often the better option.

A few of the most popular guides are:

  • Rick Steves’ France is a must-have guide for everything, from what to expect when visiting to lodging and even destinations to visit.
  • Lonely Planet France Travel Guide Book provides images and historical information along with a long list of attractions, restaurants and other locations.
  • Frommer’s France Travel Guidebook is great because it lists places to go and avoid.

8. Travel Insurance

Traveling can be one of the best moments in your life, but while you can spend a lot of time planning, things don’t always go as planned. Travel insurance is one of the must-have items to make sure that your dream vacation is never ruined.

Insurance will cover the costs of medical expenses, flight cancellations and even lost or stolen items. When the unexpected occurs, you’ll be glad that you paid for travel insurance.

If you find yourself traveling to France, these eight items will help make your trip even better.

Stages of Culture Shock

Culture shock is a common type of disorientation in a new country, new home, or new cultural setting. It’s very common for international students and immigrants while getting to know a host culture.

 

While some culture shock is somewhat inevitable, there are ways to minimize the impact this phenomenon has on your experience in your new home.

 

5 Stages of Culture Shock

The five different stages of culture shock are honeymoon, frustration, adjustment, acceptance, and re-entry. 

The Honeymoon Stage

The first stage of culture shock is initially the ‘honeymoon’ phase. This is (sort of) the best phase of culture shock because you probably aren’t feeling any of the ‘negative’ effects yet.

 

When you’re in the honeymoon period, you generally love everything about your new surroundings. You’re embracing your curiosity, exploring your new country, and ready for more.

 

Yet, it can often be the ‘overdoing’ of the honeymoon phase that can lead to the negative effects of culture shock. When you go all in and immerse yourself in another culture, it’s common to start feeling fatigued. 

 

What once were exciting new challenges can often become minor hindrances and grow into major annoyances. 

The Frustration Stage

The first ‘negative’ phase of culture shock is frustration. We all get frustrated by our day-to-day lives, but this frustration can be even more upsetting when we’re immersed in a new culture.

 

In our home culture, we often get frustrated when we’re not heard, can’t communicate, or feel invisible. These frustrations can feel exaggerated when we’re in a new culture. Not only are we dealing with everyday annoyances, but we’re dealing with these annoyances at a ‘level 10’ instead of a normal level.

 

Frustration can manifest in a host country through language miscommunications and cultural differences.

 

You might even feel frustrated because you don’t know your way around, are unfamiliar with the transportation system, and find yourself getting lost all the time.

The Adjustment Stage

The adjustment stage is when things start getting a little bit better. You’re getting used to your new surroundings and getting a hang of local languages. 

 

While you might not feel like a local, you’re starting to get used to the differences between your way of life and your host country’s. 

The Acceptance Stage

The final stage of culture shock is acceptance and assimilation. This usually happens after a few days, weeks, or months after arriving (often depending on how long you plan on staying).

 

Acceptance is when you finally start feeling like one of the locals. This often happens when you least expect it!

 

You suddenly understand how the public transportation system works, you start ‘getting’ inside jokes, and the language is less of a struggle. It may take years to fully integrate into a new culture, but you probably will still feel more comfortable during this stage than you did in previous stages.

Re-Entry Culture Shock

One more type of culture shock happens when you return home to your own culture. This is a type of reverse culture shock. 

 

You may feel like your own home culture simply doesn’t fit your lifestyle anymore or that friends and family don’t ‘get’ you. This is extremely common when traveling between developing and developed nations. 

 

It may take days, weeks, or months to feel normal again. This common type of culture shock simply shows you that you’re not the same person you were when you left your home country. 

Tips for Preventing Culture Shock

If you’re worried about culture shock (or are already feeling the effects of it), there are some ways to make your transition a little easier. 

 

Learn the Language

Before you head to your new home, start learning the language. Even if the locals speak your first language, you’ll want to start learning a few words and phrases to help you communicate.

 

Download a translation app to help you learn some of the most basic words and phrases. Apps like Vocre (available on Google Play for Android or the Apple Store for iOS) provide voice and text translation and can even be used offline. You can use these types of apps to learn the language before you leave home — as well as to help you to communicate with locals. 

Avoid Expectations

It’s totally common to have expectations of a new culture. Yet, most of our pain and suffering comes from unhealthy expectations and our realities failing to live up to such expectations. 

 

If you’re moving to Paris, you might expect to eat baguettes every day while strolling along the Champs-Élysées, speaking French to everyone you meet. While in reality, you end up finding out you hate French food, can’t communicate with locals, and get lost on the Metro at every turn. 

 

It’s important to let go of expectations before moving to a new country. The idea of the culture and the reality are often two completely different experiences.

Join Local Expat Groups

One reason many ex-pats find themselves in isolation is that it’s hard to understand what it feels like to be a stranger in a strange land — unless you’ve done it yourself. Many locals don’t understand culture shock because they’ve never experienced an immersion in a different culture.

 

One way to find a crew that understands your frustration is to join an ex-pat group. These groups are comprised of ex-pats from around the globe and other cultures, so you’re likely to find a few friends that remind you of home.

Embrace Reminders of Home

Even if you’re planning on moving to another country forever, you’ll still want to ease into any different culture. Don’t forget to bring some reminders of home with you.

 

While discovering ​new foods is always fun, you’ll still want to enjoy the food that reminds you of home. Search for ingredients to make food from your own culture. Introduce your own culture’s traditions to your new friends. Don’t forget to call friends and family back home.

 

Culture shock isn’t always easy to deal with, and it’s usually somewhat inevitable. Luckily, there are ways to make the transition a little easier.




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